‘Please Don’t Put Me on a Pedestal’ Says Dolly Parton, Who Absolutely Should Be on a Pedestal

In November, it was revealed that country music icon Dolly Parton had donated $1,000,000 to Moderna’s successful effort to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. The news surprised many, but for those who have followed Parton’s prolific career and philanthropy, it made total sense.

Not only has Parton been in the top echelon of country music artists since the mid-70s (did you know she plays 20 instruments and has written more than 3,000 songs?), she’s also become a heavyweight brand herself—starring in successful movies, launching a prolific production company, even launching her own theme park. Meanwhile, she’s also become a beloved philanthropist, funding scholarships, wildlife charities, hospitals and a literacy program that has given away more than 100 million books to children.

Her Q Score, which measures the appeal of celebrity brands, is one of the highest in the world, with one of the lowest negative ratings.

In short, pretty much everyone loves Dolly Parton.

She’s so beloved, in fact, that the Tennessee legislature has been circulating a bill to erect a statue of her in the state capitol.

The problem is, she’s having none of that right now.

Parton tweeted a statement today, declining the honor as graciously as anyone could:

“I want to thank the Tennessee legislature for their consideration of a bill to erect a statue of me on the Capitol grounds. I am honored and humbled by their intention but I have asked the leaders of teh state legislature to remove the bill from any and all consideration.

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“Given all that is going on in the world, I don’t think putting me on a pedestal is appropriate at this time. I hope, though, that somewhere down the road several years from now or perhaps after I’m gone, if you still feel I deserve it, then I’m certain I will stand proud in our great State Capitol as a grateful Tennessean.”

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