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Jonathan Merritt writes about abortion reduction in this article for RELEVANT magazine, looking past the pro-life/pro-choice dichotomy. Read More

 

Jonathan Merritt writes about abortion reduction in this article for RELEVANT magazine, looking past the pro-life/pro-choice dichotomy. Read More

 

There are probably many Christian approaches to politics. From the political involvement of most Christians, I would assume that their strategy is identical to non-Christian groups. Christians tend to focus on an issue or candidate, evaluate that person with their value system, accumulate a power base in reaction, and do what they can for or against. That is how politics works, and that seems to be how Christian politics works. Perhaps there is a difference afterward in the way the country runs; perhaps not. But is there a difference afterward in the way people view Christ? Perhaps Christians gain more respect and power after a political battle; perhaps not. But is their reflection of God one that becomes Him, and is their witness one that pleases Him?

 

In part two of "Right Wing, Wrong Bird," Dr. Joel C. Hunter gives six steps to a new understanding of political engagement. To read part one, click here

 

I have wondered if being a Christian in politics and being Christlike in politics is the same. I think not. Christian is the name of a representative group. We are a group with vested interests in the world, interests that make it difficult for us to be objective. Christ was interested in the world—not the same as having interests that need to be protected in the world. Christ could look at the world and be interested primarily in the spiritual welfare of all individuals. Christians look at the world and see “us” and “them.”