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The Atlantic Weekly has an interesting story about the curious plight of Burma, a country that has been under military rule for almost 50 years. However, in 2012, the country got its first democratically elected leadership, and their first bit of media reform goes into effect on April 1: newspapers. For the first time in half a century, the Burmese people will be allowed to print and read actual journalism, and there are a handful of citizens working around the clock to see to it that they put their new freedom to good use. A ragtag band of journalists have been creating their own personal newspaper for some time now and, come April, they'll start publishing the The Yangon Times for the masses. But, until then, they've got a lot of learning to do. The paper's chairman, Ko Ko, said that "The people are now realizing that initially there is a big dream, daily newspapers is a dream. Now the dream's come true and they started to realize this is not an easy job" ... Discuss

Legacy of a Nonconformist Saint

Why Martin Luther King Jr.’s call for “transformed nonconformists” is just as important to answer today. Read More

As we roll into 2013, it’s interesting to notice that a new year’s reboot often involves cutting out the bad more than adding in the good. Some of the most common resolutions reflect this, as people annually pledge to give up extra calories, smoking, overspending or other bad habits.

Christians often bring this avoidance approach into their faith, as well. We often define the heart of God by what ought not be done, while leaving undone the many things that ought to be done. Read More

Egypt’s controversial draft constitution goes up for vote this Saturday, and whatever happens, it will have implications for religious freedom, political future, democratic opportunity, social justice and more. The whole thing is complex, hotly debated and often misunderstood. Here’s three things you should know about the situation—and why you should care. Read More

Serving Justice vs. Saving Souls

How Can Christians move past the tension that was never supposed to exist? Read More

Where World Change Begins

Eugene Cho on why we need to start small—but can’t afford to stay there. Read More