The famed theologian's birthday would have been this week, so here's some of his timeless wisdom. Read More
 
In 'The Locust Effect,' Gary Haugen not only challenges our idea of poverty, but proposes an entirely new solution.

Just a few pages into Gary Haugen’s new book, The Locust Effect (released yesterday February 4), you will realize that you are reading something significant. By the end of the book, it seems obvious that both the goal and result of this book will be to significantly reshape how we think about anti-poverty efforts as policymakers, advocates and individuals. Read More

 
 
Our book choices reveal whose influence we value and whose we don't. Read More
 

The new “sensory fiction” project from a group of students at MIT aims to let readers actually feel the emotions of the novels they are reading. Their prototype (which you can see in action in the video below), demonstrates how the experimental technology works: Readers strap on a hi-tech vest that uses vibrations to simulate an increased heart rate and “shivers,” changes skin temperature and even has a compression component that creates tightness to convey tension and fear. When a reader turns the pages of the book, ambient light—matching the mood of the current paragraphs—is emitted. In a description of the project, the students of MIT Media Lab's Science Fiction to Science Fabrication class said, "Traditionally, fiction creates and induces emotions and empathy through words and images. By using a combination of networked sensors and actuators, the Sensory Fiction author is provided with new means of conveying plot, mood, and emotion while still allowing space for the reader's imagination" ... Discuss

 

No book—least of all one as rich and rewarding as Mary Shelley's famous monster yarn—deserves to have a movie like I, Frankenstein made out of it. But, these are strange times and so an early contender for the worst movie of 2014 is here, with Aaron Eckhart playing what is evidently supposed to be Frankenstein's monster. Please don't go see it—not when there are so many good things to recommend this week. Read More