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The folk outfit The Avett Brothers stopped by The Tonight Show this week to perform their new single “Satan Pulls the Strings,” and it was a wild time.

Their newest Rick Rubin-produced album True Sadness dropped last week, and as this raucous performance shows, it contains their signature mix of spirituality, Appalachian folk and rock ’n roll attitude. Discuss

What happens when you put fire beats behind the quick-talking skills of cowboy-hatted auctioneer swag masters?

An entire new genre of hip-hop is born. Spend your day enjoying the wonder of the "Auctioneer Beats" Vince profile. You won't regret it. Discuss

This week, hip-hop duo Social Club Misfits joins us to discuss their influences, their latest album “The Misfit Generation” and the messages behind their music. We also talk with Dr. Russell Moore, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, about how to maintain your convictions in an era of hostile political rhetoric. Read More

Everything about the original Ghostbusters movie is classic, from the film itself and the cool ghost-fighting gadgets to the logo and the theme song. And Paul Feig’s reboot—starring an incredible all-female cast of heroes—looks really promising.

Sadly though, the theme song has been ruined forever. For some reason, the filmmakers decided that Fall Out Boy should remake the theme, butchering it so horrifically, that not even a guest verse from Missy Elliot could salvage it.

Though it contains no explicit content, it is easily one of the most offensive songs we have ever heard. Listen with caution. Discuss

The music industry is fighting back against YouTube—owned by Google—and its music streaming. Taylor Swift—who famously took on Apple Music, too—is among hundreds of artists and labels who are petitioning to Congress to update the legislation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to allow them to be paid properly and have more control over the way their music is used on the website.

Joined by names such as Paul McCartney and U2, the group is arguing that the DMCA as it stands now isn't on par with technology.

The law was enacted in 1998 to protect artists' copyright laws—making it illegal to download copyrighted music, movies and any computer software and placing restrictions on the way companies can use an artist's work. But the law made 18 years ago didn't account for the advancement of technology and reach of YouTube—rendering it much less powerful.

It isn't clear what the ideal, updated DMCA would look like for artists, but they are hoping Congress will overhaul the law to give them more control over their work and more money. According to the petition,

[DMCA] has allowed major tech companies to grow and generate huge profits by creating ease of use for consumers to carry almost every recorded song in history in their pocket via a smartphone, while songwriters’ and artists’ earnings continue to diminish.

Google argues back that YouTube contributes billions to the music industry and that they have made it easier for the artists to control the ways their music can be used.

This isn't the first time a group has petitioned for Congress to update the DMCA, but this petition happens to be right as many of the major record labels are renegotiating their deals with YouTube. Discuss

Ever wanted to drive across Iceland while listening to Sigur Ros? Now is your chance. The band is currently live-streaming a 24-hour long drive around their home country while their song “Óveður” plays in the background, while also slowly transforming into different tones and ambient sounds thanks to the "generative music software" Bronze.

The concept is a little trippy, but the real-time dash cam video is pretty mesmerizing. The band explained to Pitchfork,

In a day and age of instant gratification and everything moving so fast, we wanted to do the exact opposite. Slow TV is counter-active to the world we live in, in that it happens in real time and real slow.

Enjoy the ride. Discuss