There are only so many notes out there, so there are bound to be some sour grapes whenever a song gets big. At first, that's what the latest accusation of plagiarism leveled at rock gods Led Zeppelin seemed like, but lately, the accusation is taking on some weight. So much so that a judge has thrown out the band's request to dismiss the case.

The accusations in question surround "Stairway to Heaven," the one Led Zeppelin song you've definitely heard even if you don't listen to Led Zeppelin. A not-wildly-famous '70s band called Spirit has long claimed that Zep stole the chords from their 1968 song "Taurus." The two bands did tour together for some time, giving the accusation a hint of merit. Spirit frontman Randy Craig Wolfe died penniless, but his wife has taken up his cause, pursuing a lawsuit for monetary damages. You've doubtless heard "Stairway to Heaven" before, so take a listen to "Taurus" below and see what you think. Discuss

Virgil Griffith is a CalTech student who set out to find the correlation between average SAT/ACT scores and favorite bands, because life is short and we've all got to fill our days the best way we know how. Using Facebook, CollegeBoard stats and his own know-how, he put together this chart, broadly correlating bands' fan bases with their intellect. Of course, as he notes on his site, correlation does not equal causation, so the chart might not mean anything at all, but it's interesting. As you might expect, Beethoven fans are the smartest, followed by Sufjan fans. Meanwhile, Lil Wayne fans are solidly in last place. Among Christian bands, Jars of Clay fans rank smartest and as for last place, well, don't take it personally, Casting Crowns fans ... Discuss

Here's a live video of the Lone Bellow performing "Then Came the Morning," the title track from their upcoming album, which will be released on January 27th. The Lone Bellow thrive in a live environment, and this video showcases just what makes the band click. See for yourself ... Discuss

This week we talk to one of the most prolific songwriters and worship leaders of our day, Chris Tomlin (and you won’t believe some of the questions we ask him). We also talk to author and theologian, Peter Enns about his new book, “The Bible Tells Me So,” and we relive some classic church lock-in memories. Read More

U2's bombastic, free Songs of Innocence release is the sort of thing that sort of forces you to have an opinion (the album was forced onto your hard drive, so, why not?). Some people saw it as the way of the future. Some people saw it as a grand gesture from a big band. Some people felt like the music was, well, forced on them. And then there's Black Keys drummer and noted Belieber archfoe Patrick Carney, who says the giveaway hurt U2's reputation. Apple's delivery method, "devalued their music completely," Carney told The Seattle Times, and said the deal "sends a huge mixed message to bands… that are just struggling to get by. I think that [U2] were thinking it’s super generous of them to do something like that."

Carney's opinion isn't so different from Bono's, who recently told Rolling Stone that "I had this beautiful idea and we got carried away with ourselves. Artists are prone to that kind of thing: [a] drop of megalomania, touch of generosity, dash of self-promotion and deep fear that these songs that we poured our life into over the last few years mightn't be heard. There's a lot of noise out there. I guess we got a little noisy ourselves to get through it" ... Discuss

Where other people saw predictive text as a new iOS feature that got what you were about to say right oh, maybe, half the time, Musician Jonathan Mann saw an opportunity. Here is his pop song comprised entirely of lyrical nonsense put together by Apple's predictive text, and it's the first true jam of the fall. "The only one who has been the most important thing is the only thing that could have a great way to the best of the best part is that it would mean the absolute world to me and my life" indeed ... Discuss