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The winner of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize won’t be announced until tomorrow, but odds makers (yes, you can actually place a bet on who will be given the award) have already picked their winner: Pope Francis. The Irish online gambling site Paddy Power has given the Catholic church leader 9-4 odds of taking home the prize—the best bet of all of the speculative nominees. Other favorites from bookies on the site include women’s education advocate Malala Yousafzai, whistleblower Edward Snowden and Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta ... Discuss

In a recent interview with reporters while traveling from South Korea, Pope Francis revealed that he believes he only has "two or three years" left, and would even consider retiring early. The 77-year-old leader of the Catholic church said,

I see it as the generosity of the people of God. I try to think of my sins, my mistakes, not to become proud. Because I know it will last only a short time. Two or three years and then I'll be off to the Father's house.

Pope Francis said that though the idea “does not appeal to some theologians," he would consider retirement if he began to feel like he couldn’t handle his responsibilities as pope, like his predecessor. Pope Francis said that “"Benedict XVI opened a door,” and even admitted that he is currently being treated for nerve problems ... Discuss

In a conversation with reporters, Pope Francis said that the U.N.—and not a single country—should be involved in the decision to take action against ISIS, but protecting Christians and religious minorities in Iraq was essential.

In these cases, where there is an unjust aggression I can only say that it is legitimate to stop the unjust aggressor. I underscore the verb 'to stop'. I am not saying 'bomb' or 'make war', but stop him (the aggressor). The means by which he can be stopped must be evaluated. Stopping the unjust aggressor is legitimate

Pope Francis said that a senior church official has been sent to Iraq to distribute charity funds and minister to refugees who have been displaced by ISIS. The brutal Islamic group has forced thousands to flee their homes and have been targeting Christians and other religious groups who do not adhere to their radical ideology. The pope also revealed that he sent a letter to the U.N. Secretary-General, reiterating how important it is that ISIS be stopped ... Discuss

Pope Francis may be 77 years old, but he still believes that his message to younger generations about technology is an important one. During a sermon in Germany, the pope called the Internet a "gift from God,” but warned of the dangers of wasting your life playing with the latest gadgets, adding, “Our life is made up of time, and time is a gift from God, so it is important that it be used in good and fruitful actions.”

Maybe many young people waste too many hours on futile things … chatting on the Internet or with smartphones, watching TV soap operas, and (using) the products of technological progress, which should simplify and improve the quality of life, but distract attention away from what is really important.

The pope, who is active on Twitter himself, did praise the power of the Internet, but said it should be “a network not of wires but of people" … Discuss

Addressing the Mexico-Holy See Colloquium on Migration and Development through a letter this week, Pope Francis weighed in on the situation unfolding on the American border, where thousands of unaccompanied, undocumented children have been detained. Many of the children are from Central American countries and have made the journey to the United States alone. Pope Francis urged the international community to have compassion for the children “who migrate alone, unaccompanied, to escape poverty and violence,” remembering that they made the journey “in pursuit of a hope that in most cases turns out to be vain.”

This humanitarian emergency requires, as a first urgent measure, these children be welcomed and protected. These measures, however, will not be sufficient, unless they are accompanied by policies that inform people about the dangers of such a journey and, above all, that promote development in their countries of origin.

An interview with Pope Francis conducted by the founder of the Italian La Repubblica newspaper is making some serious waves. During a conversation with editor Eugenio Scalfari, the Pope reportedly said his advisors have told him that about 2 percent of Catholic Clergy are pedophiles, adding, "Among the 2% who are pedophiles are priests, bishops and cardinals. Others, more numerous, know but keep quiet. They punish without giving the reason. I find this state of affairs intolerable."

The Vatican, however, has taken issue with the article, noting that Scalfari doesn’t record interviews, and instead reconstructs them from memory afterward. Church officials say the three-page interview isn’t Pope Francis’ exact words and specifically disputes that he said that that cardinals were among the 2 percent of clergy that are pedophiles. Pope Francis was also quoted as saying that the crimes were “a leprosy in our house,” and vowed continued action against it. The headline for the piece read, "Pope says: Like Jesus, I shall use a stick against pedophile priests" ... Discuss