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The Definitive Ranking of Bands From Christian Pop Punk's Glory Days

Looking back at 15 of the late-'90s' best Christian pop punk bands. Read More

Ivan & Alyosha

The rising folk act on their new inspiration Read More

Echosmith

Meet the four siblings taking over the pop music charts Read More

This week we talk to author Rachel Held Evans about her new book, Searching For Sunday. Plus, folk rocker Matthew Mayfield, Joy returns, euros, gyros, shofars and a goodbye to the man behind the ones, twos, threes and fours. This episode is sponsored by Stamps.com. Read More

Sufjan Stevens Reflects on God and Death on ‘Carrie & Lowell’

Sufjan Stevens’ new album is an honest, emotional look at loss, faith and lament. Read More

On Monday afternoon, Jay-Z and a host of other famous musicians (Kanye, Beyonce, Daft Punk, Madonna, Jack White, Chris Martin, Jason Aldean, Alicia Keys, members of Arcade Fire, Rihanna and more) introduced their new artist-owned streaming service, Tidal at a press conference in New York City. The press conference didn’t give much information that wasn’t already out there, with the group re-affirming their dedication to “re-establish the value of music” and “create a better experience for both fans and artists.”

So what sets Tidal apart from other streaming services? First and foremost, the emphasis seems to be on the artists themselves, giving them more direct control over their content. Many of the artists involved have spoken out against how free streaming services such as Spotify pay artists, and though Tidal offers a free 30-day trial, users have to pay to keep a subscription—either $9.99/month or $19.99/month—which will allow Tidal to pay artists double the standard streaming royalties. The more expensive of the two offers higher sound quality than the usual compressed format, which is apparently one of the other things that sets Tidal apart from other streaming services. It will also offer hi-def videos and “expertly curated” editorial and playlists.

A lot of high-profile musicians have expressed support for the service, but it remains to be seen whether record companies (which, as The New York Times points out, often control music distribution rights) and fans will get on board... Discuss