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The team at BusinessInsider.com has created this large infograph outlining the best jobs for each one of the 16 personalities described in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test. Obviously, the list isn’t perfect, but it does provide some interesting insight into information that they claim “about 80% of the Fortune 500 and 89 of Fortune 100 companies use” to analyze their employees. For the infograph data, they teamed with one of the authors of Do What You Are, Paul Tieger, and applied the methodology of the book. You can see the whole chart here ... Discuss

Now that filmmaker David Fincher is no longer attached to direct an upcoming biopic of Apple founder Steve Jobs—written by Aaron Sorkin—Sony is reportedly now in talks with director Danny Boyle to helm the project. And, according to The Hollywood Reporter, unlike Fincher, who wanted Christian Bale for the role of Jobs, Boyle is lobbying for Leo DiCaprio to get the part of the iconic tech industry leader. Though deals aren’t yet signed, it wouldn’t be the first time the two have worked together; DiCaprio starred in Boyle’s 2000 thriller The Beach. Unlike the poorly received Ashton Kutcher flop, Sorkin’s film is based on Walter Isaacson’s bestselling biography, which was written in close collaboration with Jobs before his death .. Discuss

When You Don't Have a Job You Love

Finding the purpose behind your work—even if it isn't at your dream job. Read More

The team behind The Social Network is turning their attention to another Silicon Valley story. Writer Aaron Sorkin and director David Fincher are adapting Apple founder’s Steve Jobs bestselling biography by author Walter Isaacson. As The Hollywood Reporter notes, for his book Isaacson “obtained unrivaled access to Jobs during the last years of his life.” By all indications, this version looks like it will likely be better received than 2013’s Jobs, starring Ashton Kutcher, which earned only $35 million globally and has a Rotten Tomatoes score of just 27% ... Discuss

If you spend a portion of your workday looking at Facebook on your iPhone, you may actually be helping your company out. According to a new study from a team at Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, "Having workers take small breaks on their phones throughout the day may positively influence their perceived well-being at the end of the workday.” They observed that employees who played games, browsed the web (presumably reading Slices on RELEVANTmagazine.com) and texted friends for about 20 minutes throughout the day, tended to be more happy and just as productive as non-phone-using workers. The most happy employees though, were the ones who used social media. "If they are happy with social activities and employers know that, they may want to use the phone for those purposes during microbreaks in the future" ... Discuss

Dream Job or Dream Community?

The tension of leaving a great community for your 'next right step.' Read More