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Religion makes people more generous. That’s the finding of a recent poll commissioned by BBC that asked more than 2,500 people questions about their religious beliefs and their giving habits. The poll numbers—which were collected by the research group ComRes—found that respondents across the U.K. who claimed to be practicing believers were more likely to have made a recent charitable donation than those who were not religious. Read More

Can You Be Generous and Still Pay the Bills?

One couple does the math on giving and receiving. Read More

Panera restaurants in the St. Louis area will begin experimenting with new pay-what-you-want pricing for their Turkey Chili in a Bread Bowl. But beyond just a marketing ploy, the Meal of Shared Responsibility is actually a way for the restaurant chain to encourage customers to help give to those in need.

Here’s how it works: Any amount above the suggested $5.89 price will go toward the meals of customers who couldn’t pay and to St. Louis-area hunger programs. The idea is that those in genuine need of a good meal (the chili contains about a day's worth of nutrition), can get a free bowl of chili, and other generous customers will help offset the cost … Discuss

Jennifer was a new employee at a realty company in Florida, and decided to opt out of the office’s lottery pool because she hadn’t received her first paycheck yet. After all, what are the odds they would actually win the lottery on the one week she didn’t participate? Thankfully for Jennifer, her fellow co-workers are awesome. When one of the tickets did hit the million-dollar jackpot, they decided to include Jennifer in the winnings anyway. And, to the impatient guy who cut them in line at the convenience store while they were purchasing the tickets, thanks … Discuss

Despite frequent news headlines about the generosity of American billionaires, according to a new study, in the U.S., the poor are more generous than the rich. The Atlantic recently looked at one of the most “confounding, facts of charity in America”: People who can’t really afford to give, typically donate more than those who can afford to.

In recent years, the top 20% of America’s wealthiest donated 1.3% of their incomes to charity, while the bottom 20% gave 3.2% of theirs. When sociologists looked at what’s behind the numbers, they found a surprising reason: It’s not that the country’s poorest are more generous than the typical person, it’s that America’s rich are far less generous than most people … Discuss

29 Creative Ways to Say "I Love You"

This Valentine's Day, don't limit your love to roses and candy. Read More