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4 Myths Christians Need to Stop Believing About Depression

It's time for the Church to get real about depression. Read More

My Friend is Depressed. What Should I Do?

How to help when you just don't know what to say. Read More

How to Help a Friend Fight Depression

7 dos and don'ts for helping a friend who struggles with depression. Read More

A new study from researchers at the University of Washington provides us all with even more reasons why we should stop stressing out so much. As part of the research—the findings were recently published in journals Nature and Nature Neuroscience—the team looked at dopamine levels in lab mice, and how they are affected by stressful situations. Though the details of the experiment, and how the brain processes hormones and chemicals, get a bit technical (the Wall Street Journal has a really interesting write-up that outlines the study), their ultimate findings suggested that stress may prevent the brain from feeling pleasure, possibly even triggering major depression. As WSJ puts it, after extended periods of stress,

A switch has been flipped; stimuli that would normally evoke motivated exploration and a sense of reward now evoke the opposite. Remarkably, those few days of stress caused that anhedonic state to last in those mice for at least three months.

Though researchers still have a lot to understand about the brain and depression, the finding suggest that chilling out could be an important factor in staying happy ... Discuss

We live in a world that seems to focus on problems, uncertain situations and the absolutely ridiculous. In the past several weeks, I’ve watched the news at night and heard reports about how our economy is about to go from bad to worse, how solar flares from the sun are going to make airplanes crash, how an asteroid barely missed Earth and how to survive a zombie attack. (No, I am not making this up!) Read More

How the Church Should Talk About Depression

To Write Love On Her Arms founder Jamie Tworkowski on how the Church's conversation about mental health is shifting. Read More