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5 Mistakes People Make When Reading the Bible

Contrary to popular belief, reading the Bible takes actual, real effort. Read More

9 Things Everyone Should Do When Reading the Bible

A few simple habits to build into your Bible reading. Read More

Book designer Adam Greene wants to turn the modern, printed Bible into a visually beautiful, easy-to-read, redesigned work of art. Greene’s Kickstarter has raised more than $750,000 for the intensive project that—by drawing inspiration from the dimensions of the Ark of the Covenant—turns the Bible into a re-organized, four volume series, each the size of a contemporary novel. As he explains, the vision of the Bibliotheca project is taken from the history of scripture:

The literature of the Bible was experienced by its ancient audiences as pure literary art—written or oral—with none of the encyclopedic conventions we are accustomed to today (chapter divisions, verse numbers, notes, cross references, etc.). Furthermore, the texts were appreciated as individual works of literature, which gradually accumulated into what we recognize as the biblical anthology. By separating the text into several volumes, and by applying classic & elegant typography, Bibliotheca is meant to provide a fresh alternative to the reader who wants to enjoy the biblical library anew, as great literary art.

You can learn more about the project, and see images of the four-volume set here ... Discuss

Well, what dost thou knoweth? According to recent research, the King James Bible is far and away the most popular translation among Americans.

According to the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis’ “The Bible in American Life” report, 55 percent of American Bible readers preferred the classic KJV translation, compared to 19 percent who chose the NIV (the second most popular). Read More

According to a new Gallup Poll, more than 1 in 4 Americans believe that the Bible is the actual word of God and should be interpreted literally, “word for word.” Even though that number seems pretty high, it’s actually down by 3% from 2007, and dramatically since the late ‘70s when 40% of Americans maintained that belief. The most recent poll found that a whopping 47% of Americans say that the Bible is "the inspired word of God—but not everything in it should be taken literally," meaning that more than 75% of Americans believe God inspired scripture, even though they disagree how it should be interpreted. Unfortunately, Americans’ feelings about Old Testament rock monsters were not made clear by the poll results ... Discuss