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The NFL came under renewed criticism Monday night when Kansas City safety Husain Abdullah received a penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct after he knelt on the ground to pray after a touchdown. The NFL rulebook prohibits using the ground for celebration, but as many Twitter users pointed out, several Christian players have knelt on the ground to pray without receiving any penalty, while Abdullah, who is a devout Muslim, got a 15-yard penalty. The NFL quickly clarified that the ruling was wrong, as the practice is “not to flag player who goes to ground for religious reasons.” Abdullah said he thought the penalty was for sliding, not the prayer itself. “I just got a little too excited,” he told a local news station. But many are still arguing that the initial call shows a double standard on religion in the league ... Discuss

On September 27, Makenzie and Steven Schultz were getting dinner in a Cedar Rapids sushi restaurant and were served by a desperately overworked waiter. The couple say he was in charge of 12 tables and, although he stayed pleasant and apologetic throughout the night, it took 20 minutes to get them water and 40 minutes for appetizers. Fortunately, the couple had met while waiting tables at a Bubba Gump restaurant, and knew that, sometimes, the night is just not conducive to great service. So they, awesomely, chose to tip their water $100 on a $66 tab, and left him a note saying they'd been in his shoes.

Makenzie posted a picture of the check on Facebook, saying, "We walked out before he saw this and I’m not posting this for a pat on the back. I’m just sharing this as a friendly reminder to think of the entire situation, before you judge" ... Discuss

Of all the places that would be hard to intrude, it seems like the White House would be the hardest. But Omar Jose Gonzalez, the man who was arrested earlier this month for charging into the residence, made it much further than Secret Service officials initially reported, according to the Washington Post. Early reports said the intruder was stopped at the front door, but it seems a knife-wielding Gonzalez managed to jump the White House fence, sprint across the lawn, past a Secret Service guard, into the residence and into the White House's East Room before finally being tackled by an agent. In fact, he darted right past a staircase that led directly to the Obamas' living room.

The security breakdown appears to begin with "crash boxes"—alarms that are set to go off whenever anyone treads on the White House lawn. Those had been either turned down or completely disabled by White House ushers who found them "disruptive." But the list of failures doesn't end there—Gonzalez, intentionally or otherwise, dodged at least five checkpoints, including a group of plainclothes officers, a security guard, an attack dog and an entire SWAT team. Secret Service Director Julia Pierson will testify about what went wrong in front of Congress on Tuesday and has called the breach "unacceptable" ... Discuss

A couple weeks ago, Jeezy collaborated with Kendrick Lamar for a remix of Jeezy's "Holy Ghost," and they used a sample of a T.D. Jakes sermon titled, "Don't Let the Chatter Stop You." The song spread (as just about anything involving K.Dot is bound to) and was lent some real passion by Jakes' words: "I’m under attack, but I’m still on fire. I got some chatter, but I’m still on fire. I got some threat, but I’m still on fire." But Jakes was not happy. He posted on Facebook that he intends to take legal action against Jeezy.

Hip-hop runs up against intellectual property issues almost as often as churches do, as both places are open to what rappers call "sampling" and pastors call "being inspired" in varying degrees of legality. Jeezy has pulled the song from Soundcloud and YouTube, and everyone's spokesperson is staying mum on the issue. Everyone except for Georgetown University professor and hip-hop expert Michael Eric Dyson, who expressed to The Guardian his opinion that, "It’s an unfortunate example of the disconnect between an elder, like T.D. Jakes, who is an undeniably gifted and remarkable human being, but may be not necessarily as in touch as he should be with the currency of a younger generation" ... Discuss

This weekend quietly marked the end of an era. On Saturday morning, the CW showed Cubix, Sonic X, Dragon Ball Z and Kai, Digimon Fusion, Yu-Gi-Oh! and a few others for the last time. Next Saturday, the CW will move on to One Magnificent Morning, a block of live-action, educational entertainment for kids. And, believe it or not, that will be it for Saturday morning cartoons on network television. Of course, on cable, animation is doing just fine—Disney, Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network are still putting out all kinds of cartoons. But this marks the first time animation won't be part of network television's Saturday morning lineup since the '60s. Somehow, despite Michael Bay's best efforts, kids just aren't as into cartoons as they used to be ... Discuss

Over the weekend, internationally renowned human rights lawyer Amal Alamuddin finally tied the knot with a noted American actor by the name of George Clooney. You've probably heard of him. You probably know an awful lot about him actually. In fact, by this point, you're likely aware that the two exchanged vows in Venice during what was, in all likelihood, a fairly well-to-do ceremony, attended by the likes of Bono, Bill Murray and Bradgelina.

But though Alamuddin's name doesn't have quite the global currency of her new husband's, she is definitely awesome. Over her storied career, Alamuddin has worked with the UN on a broad spectrum of human rights issues, including drone warfare, protecting children caught in war zones and ending sexual violence in London, where she lives. Her new husband is an Oscar winning actor who has lately found some innovative ways to combat genocide. Congratulations to the happy couple ... Discuss