Asking Dangerous Questions

Questions are dangerous. They can overthrow governments, tear apart families and reveal ugly truths about the world and ourselves.

But they can also overthrow complacency, tear apart false assumptions and reveal beautiful possibilities about ourselves and our future.

If making statements is like using truth like a sword, asking questions is like searching for truth via acupuncture. Ask the right questions, and the truth begins opening up to you in whole new ways.


Questions can overthrow governments, tear apart families and reveal ugly truths about the world and ourselves.

But they can also overthrow complacency, tear apart false assumptions and reveal beautiful possibilities about ourselves and our future.

If making statements is like using truth like a sword, asking questions is like searching for truth via acupuncture. Ask the right questions, and the truth begins opening up to you in whole new ways.

At Mosaic, we ask a lot of questions. We ask, we pose, we wonder.

Phrases you'll hear at our gatherings across the city often sound like this:

"Could it be...?"

"I wonder if...?"

"What would happen if...?"

Mosaic's ethos is one of adventure. Every person on our volunteer staff (we don't have "members") desires to partner with each other to serve a city asking the same questions we are—a city searching for what's important, what matters, what's healthy, what's beautiful. We're convinced that this City of Angels is searching for God.

And so our questions that we ask as we develop emerging leaders revolve around this adventure. We state the value like this: Mission is Why Mosaic Exists. This means that we're passionate about giving dignity to people's spiritual journeys and fanatical about helping people in any way we can meet a God that will actually draw out of them creativity and compassion and beauty.

Here are some questions that I regularly ask myself, my friends, teams I work with and leaders I serve with. Every person on volunteer staff at Mosaic has (or should have) a growing sense of clarity in answering these questions. These questions challenge me, inspire me and sometimes even encourage me, and I wanted to share them with you.

-How do I regularly initiate conversations allowing other people to talk about their spiritual journeys?

-How do I actively try to sense how God is moving in someone’s life as they search for God, and draw that out in a positive way?

-How do I see my work as a place where I can regularly invest in people who are searching for God?

-How do I regularly utilize Sunday gatherings as a resource for investing in my friends who are spiritually curious?

-How can I sense my desire for people to know God increasing?

What questions do you tend to use?

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