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The Walking Dead may be hibernating, but fans of great television hardly need to be told that Mad Men makes its return this weekend, which ought to stave off the pain. But it's also a great weekend for small films, as a few movies in sadly limited release promise some very big things. And if indie flicks and advertising agency drama isn't your thing, well, the weather's getting nicer. Be creative.

Mad Men

Why We Like It

This Sunday, the sixth season of Mad Men returns and, with it, one of television's surest bets. While detractors write it off as parade of suits and sex, AMC's acclaimed drama is one of the best chronicles of the human heart in ages.

The Burgess Boys

Why We Like It

Elizabeth Strout achieved fame for her Olive Kitteridge, and has now returned with The Burgess Boys, an excellent portrayal two brothers attempting to learn how the other has grown into adulthood as they grapple with their nephew's hate crimes.

Upstream Color

Why We Like It

Shane Carruth's first film, Primer, may be the most intellectually demanding films you will ever watch. The time travel thriller pulls the rug out from you so many times that the entire movie ends up being a brilliant free fall of plot twists. His follow-up, Upstream Color got a lot of attention at Sundance, but doesn't appear to be any easier to wrap your head around (Carruth has called it "unspoilable.")

Rilo Kiley, 'RKives'

Why We Like It

Rilo Kiley never got as famous as they should have. Although the band as a whole is generally overshadowed by the fame of lead singer Jenny Lewis, the band's influence on the indie folk genre can't be overestimated. They were plucking banjos and wailing mournfully about lost love while Mumford was still teaching his sons to walk, and while RKives is just a collection of b-sides, rarities and songs that ended up on the cutting room floor, other bands would call it a career.

Trance

Why We Like It

Danny Boyle's headed back to where he cut his teeth—frenetic, eyeball-blitzing head-spinners. It looks to be a welcome to return to form, with James McAvoy serving as an art thief put under hypnosis to remember where he stashed his loot.

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