RELEVANT Recommends

It's a pretty slow week in the creative media business, as February is usually the dumping ground for everything studios don't have much faith in, but that's why RELEVANT Recommends exists: to find the things that are worth your time, however difficult that might be. And there is a handful this week, including the DVD release of Bully, which might be one of the more challenging documentaries you'll ever watch.

The Oscars

Why We Like It

It's shaping up to be a fairly interesting race for the Oscars, with no clear favorite for Best Picture and more than a handful of dark-horse candidates with a decent chance of an upset.

Bully

Why We Like It

Out on DVD this week is Bully, Lee Hirsch's gorgeous, heart-wrenching documentary on America's bullying crisis. It follows five children over the course of one school year and how the ongoing nature of their tormenting peers affects their lives, their family dynamics, the school and society as a whole. With all the hullabaloo about bullying out there, Hirsch's documentary is one of the few sources of substance and quality.

Foals' 'Holy Fire'

Why We Like It

Foals has flitted on the outside of "The UK's Next Big Thing" for a while now, but its new release, Holy Fire, ought to set the group over the top. It's Brit rock the way you remember it from about a decade ago—grungy, swampy and glorious.

Klansville, USA

Why We Like It

Last year's Django Unchained showed the Ku Klux Klan as we generally think of it: masked, shadowy and secretive. But David Cunningham's fascinating new book, Klansville, U.S.A., explores a different side to the KKK: one that was out in the open, unafraid and very proud of its horrifying dogma. Cunningham's book is revelatory, well-researched and reveals not only the Klan's influence on the turn-of-the-century South, but its continued pull today.

No

Why We Like It

One of the favorites at Cannes Film Festival and an Academy Award nominee for Best Foreign Language Film, No is the true story of the marketing campaign behind the overthrow of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. Gael Garcia Bernal, whose moving, affecting performance anchored The Motorcycle Diaries, is the film's secret weapon.

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