Christians Should Be Offended By Bad Art

Why Christians should have high creative standards.

I grew up in the 1980s, when the Christian music industry was still in its infancy, and when—in most cases—the measure of an album or a song was not the quality of the product as a whole, but rather its Jesus-per-minute rate. The main goal was to share the Gospel of Jesus, and the quality or originality of the musical form was an afterthought at best.

To its credit, the quality of Christian music has massively improved over the last 30 years, but there are still many corners of Christianity in which careful design of the form of a work doesn’t really matter all that much as long as the message is seen as being positive. Of course, Christians don't have the corner on low-quality productions, but as followers of the ultimate creator, Christians should especially care about good design and well-made art.

This time of the year, when awards shows celebrate excellent and important art, Christians have an opportunity to reflect on why upholding high artistic standards can be an important part of our witness.

Beyond the Basics

First of all, I firmly agree that the Gospel of Jesus should be central, but in contrast to much of the Christian music (and most of the evangelical culture) of the 1980s, that doesn't mean that the Gospel can, or should, be reduced to a few basic convictions about Jesus. If we are to believe the New Testament, that through Christ, God is reconciling all creation, things on earth as well as things in heaven (see, for instance, Colossians 1:19-20), there is nothing that can be taken for granted. The design and form of our work bears witness to what we believe, just as much as the content of the work.

Through Christ, God is reconciling all creation, so there is nothing that can be taken for granted. The design and form of our work bears witness to what we believe, just as much as the content of the work.

It is striking that Jesus referred to himself as “the way” (John 14:6). As followers of “the way,” it is not enough to believe certain things about Jesus, or to do the things He taught us to do, but we must also be seeking to do them in the way that He did. We cannot separate our means from our ends.

The Value of Sacrifice

If these convictions about the Gospel of Jesus are true, then good, hard work should be a top priority for us as followers of Jesus. The way of Jesus is marked, above all, by sacrifice. Not only did Jesus give His life on the Cross for humanity, His whole life was a sacrifice. He gave up the comforts of heaven—He “did not regard equality with God as something to be exploited” writes the Apostle Paul (Philippians)—and became human, entering fully into all the suffering and joy of the human experience.

If the way of Christ is marked by sacrifice, should not we also be willing to make the necessary sacrifices to do good work, especially when we are creating something we explicitly intend to bear witness to the good news of Jesus Christ?

Good work indeed will require sacrifices of us: hundreds, if not thousands, of hours learning a craft, studying the masters, practicing, training our eyes and ears to discern what good work is and why it is good.

Designed Collaboration

And maybe if there are areas in which we have not been trained, we need to make sacrifices to collaborate with someone who has, paying them at least a fair price for their labor. A songwriter might need accompanying musicians; an author might need a designer to do good work in designing a book cover; a playwright will need actors and a theater to bring her play to life. Good and careful work bears faithful witness to the costly discipleship to which we have been called. And the converse is also true. “Bad Christian art that reflects a lack of investment of time, commitment, craft, or skill, presents the illusion that the Christian life is not worthy or requiring of the same,” writes author and literature professor Karen Swallow Prior.

Always Learning

Of course, that does not mean that art is not worth doing if you have not mastered your medium. Few of us will ever be recognized as masters of our particular craft. The way of Jesus is not only marked by sacrifice, but also by humility. To be a disciple is to be one who is always learning.

At whatever stage of learning we are at, we should be willing to exhibit our art with the expectation that it will generate conversation, and likely criticism. Critique is part of the learning process, and good critique fosters mutual conversation that not only helps the artist learn and grow, but also helps the critic understand the artist and the context within which the work was done.

Critics may sometimes be mistaken, but such error will not be known without conversation. An even worse problem than bad art is bad art that is above scrutiny, or artists who refuse to enter into conversation about their work. If we are not willing to follow in the humility of Jesus, then what kind of witness does that bear about us and about our art?

The Gospel of Jesus is much more than a few Scripture verses or a few ideas about God; it is a way of being in the world and living our everyday lives.

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As creative Christians, we need to be especially attentive to all facets of our work: design, form, content, function. Does our work bear witness to the goodness of Jesus, and particularly to the sacrifice and humility He embodied for us?

Yes, this is a high bar, and yes, we will repeatedly fail, but more important than succeeding or failing is our willingness to be disciples, always to be learning, growing and maturing.

This article has been updated from an earlier version.

Top Comments

Less Than Christian

3

Less Than Christian commented…

Yes. Yes. Yes. YES. Dear God, YES. I've often been incredibly frustrated with art being good "for Christian" art. Or viewing Christian art as more an "alternative" to secular art, than just "good art". Our art should be held to a higher standard that can "compete" in the market in which we are trying to affect change.

David James Haisell

66

David James Haisell commented…

Christianity used to corner the market on good art. Galleries around the world are full of examples of it. Unfortunately, Christian art and music were also casualties of the Reformation in many denominations, often meeting violent and flammable ends in the belief that they were "graven images". The legacy of that is something modern Christianity is still struggling with.

7 Comments

Brandi Davis

9

Kristina Parks

1

Kristina Parks commented…

This article has put exactly what I've been thinking for a long time on paper. Thanks for writing this!

David James Haisell

66

David James Haisell commented…

Christianity used to corner the market on good art. Galleries around the world are full of examples of it. Unfortunately, Christian art and music were also casualties of the Reformation in many denominations, often meeting violent and flammable ends in the belief that they were "graven images". The legacy of that is something modern Christianity is still struggling with.

Gretchen Smith

1

Gretchen Smith commented…

It is not the responsibility of the artist to reflect on the past or confront the present. It is the responsibility of the artist who is in Christ to point the way to the future, to share the hope that they have found in Christ and be a prophetic voice in a sea of immature and poorly crafted creations that should not even be labelled as art. Art should not illustrate, it should permeate to the deepest part of the viewers soul and nudge them, or sometimes shove them in the right direction.

Wesley Switzer

1

Wesley Switzer commented…

Hello Christopher, thank you for the article. You bring up some valid points, but there are 2 things in your article that I question. #1 is saying that sacrifice is important above all. Scripture says that obedience is better than sacrifice in 1 Samuel 15:22. While Jesus sacrificed everything, it was because he was being obedient to his father. His obedience is what led to his sacrifice, and in his own words, he came to do the will of his father (John 6:38). If it was all about sacrifice, then you would be talking about works instead of faith, and that is most definitely off the mark. #2 is saying that Christian music from the 1980's lacks quality and creativity. While I agree it applies to some Christian music from that era, you have to look at the 80's as a whole. It also applies to music from any genre in the 80's, not just Christian. Thank you again for the article, keep writing.

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