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This week we talk to one of the most prolific songwriters and worship leaders of our day, Chris Tomlin (and you won’t believe some of the questions we ask him). We also talk to author and theologian, Peter Enns about his new book, “The Bible Tells Me So,” and we relive some classic church lock-in memories. Read More

Meet 15-year-old aspiring filmmaker Morgan Spence, who was recruited to be part of Lego artist Warren Elsmore's Brick Flicks project. Spence has edited together a series of iconic movie scenes—from Singin' In the Rain to Wayne's World to Titanic—using Legos. Everything is awesome, perhaps, but Spence is doing his part to make them all a little more awesome ... Discuss

U2's bombastic, free Songs of Innocence release is the sort of thing that sort of forces you to have an opinion (the album was forced onto your hard drive, so, why not?). Some people saw it as the way of the future. Some people saw it as a grand gesture from a big band. Some people felt like the music was, well, forced on them. And then there's Black Keys drummer and noted Belieber archfoe Patrick Carney, who says the giveaway hurt U2's reputation. Apple's delivery method, "devalued their music completely," Carney told The Seattle Times, and said the deal "sends a huge mixed message to bands… that are just struggling to get by. I think that [U2] were thinking it’s super generous of them to do something like that."

Carney's opinion isn't so different from Bono's, who recently told Rolling Stone that "I had this beautiful idea and we got carried away with ourselves. Artists are prone to that kind of thing: [a] drop of megalomania, touch of generosity, dash of self-promotion and deep fear that these songs that we poured our life into over the last few years mightn't be heard. There's a lot of noise out there. I guess we got a little noisy ourselves to get through it" ... Discuss

NBC wants to bring one of the U.K.’s most popular sitcoms to U.S. audiences. Producer Bill Lawrence—the guy behind an upcoming Rush Hour TV series—is working with NBC to produce an American version of the acclaimed British workplace comedy The IT Crowd. Remaking a beloved show isn’t easy (though it worked for The Office), but Lawrence is working with the writing team of Neil Goldman and Garrett Donovan (who’ve worked on shows including Community, Scrubs and Family Guy) to see if they can bring the concept new life in the U.S. Weirdly, it’s not the first time NBC has tried to remake the show. Back in 2006, they actually produced a version starring a pre-Community Joel McHale they never ended up airing ... Discuss

You may remember a meme floating around Facebook over the last few months, in which friends would ask each other to share “10 books that have stayed with you" as a status update. The lists spread across the social network, with hundreds of thousands of Facebook users around the world ranking their favorite books. Now, Facebook has tallied up the full rankings across eight countries (that had at least 20,000 take part in the meme), to see which books where most beloved around the globe.

The list in the U.S., U.K., Italy, Philippines, Brazil, India and France were all dominated by one work: J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. The only country among the lists not topped by Harry Potter was Mexico (it ranked third), where One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez took the No. 1 spot.

The Bible on the other hand, didn’t fare as well. It ranked sixth for U.S. and U.K. readers, and barely cracked the top 10 in one other country, Brazil ... Discuss

If you’ve ever watched one of Bill Murray’s guest appearances on The Late Show, than you know that he’s never overly interested in promoting whatever recent film he’s starring in. Usually, he’s got bigger things on his mind. This week, he joined Letterman—wearing a tuxedo—only to inform him that the interview was coinciding with his marathon training. Pure Bill Murray magic ensues ... Discuss

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